Porsche Car and SUV News and Reviews






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Reviews of Porsche cars and SUVs, and Porsche industry news.
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Porsche Reveals its First 992 Generation 911 Race Car, the GT3 Cup https://www.autoweek.com/news/sports-cars/a34950730/porsche-reveals-its-first-992-generation-911-race-car-the-gt3-cup/
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<ul class=”body-ul”><li><strong>Porsche has launched a new 911-based race car</strong></li><li><strong>It will debut March 16-17, 2021 at Sebring</strong></li><li><strong>The car, called the GT3 Cup, boasts 503 hp</strong><br></li></ul><ol></ol><hr><p class=”body-text”>Porsche is slowly but surely spreading the <a class=”body-link” href=”https://www.autoweek.com/drives/a32047321/2021-porsche-911-turbo-s-review-test-drive/” target=”_blank” data-vars-ga-outbound-link=”https://www.autoweek.com/drives/a32047321/2021-porsche-911-turbo-s-review-test-drive/”>992-generation 911 </a> lineup. Now it includes the race cars. Starting at the Porsche Carrera Cup North America event, held at <a class=”body-link” href=”https://www.autoweek.com/news/sports-cars/a31439533/imsa-mobil-1-12-hours-of-sebring-postponed-until-november/” target=”_blank” data-vars-ga-outbound-link=”https://www.autoweek.com/news/sports-cars/a31439533/imsa-mobil-1-12-hours-of-sebring-postponed-until-november/”>Sebring International Raceway</a> on March 16-17, 2021, drivers will race the new, 992 based, <a class=”body-link” href=”https://www.autoweek.com/drives/a1696581/2019-porsche-911-gt3-rs-first-drive-singing-soprano-heavens/” target=”_blank” data-vars-ga-outbound-link=”https://www.autoweek.com/drives/a1696581/2019-porsche-911-gt3-rs-first-drive-singing-soprano-heavens/”>GT3</a> Cup race car.<br></p><p class=”body-text”>The new GT3 Cup continues to use a naturally aspirated 4.0-liter flat-six engine, but horsepower bumps up to 503 at 8400 rpm, 900 rpm higher than the outgoing motor. Torque peaks at 347 lb-ft at 6150 rpm and the six horizontally opposed cylinders pump pistons as fast as 8,700 revolutions per minute. </p><p class=”body-text”>Attached ahead of the engine is a six-speed paddle-shift controlled gearbox using a single mass-flywheel and a three-plate racing clutch. Porsche claims the engine can run on track for 100 hours before needing any maintenance and the gearbox can run 60 hours before a minor inspection and 120 hours in between overhauls.</p><div class=”embed embed-image embed-image-center embed-image-medium” data-align=”center” data-size=”medium”>

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<picture class><source media=”(min-width: 61.25rem)” srcset=”https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/m20-5569-fine-1607795573.jpg?resize=768:*”><source media=”(min-width: 48rem)” srcset=”https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/m20-5569-fine-1607795573.jpg?resize=980:*”><source media=”(min-width: 30rem)” srcset=”https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/m20-5569-fine-1607795573.jpg?resize=640:*”><img alt=”the 2021 porsche 911 gt3 cup from the back” title class=”lazyimage lazyload” data-src=”https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/m20-5569-fine-1607795573.jpg?resize=480:*”></picture></div>

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<figcaption>The 2021 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup from the back</figcaption><p>
<span class=”image-photo-credit”>Porsche</span></p>

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<p class=”body-text”>The body this engine is pushing through the air is built from a mix of roughly 70 percent aluminum and 30 percent steel. Additionally, you have lightweight polycarbonate instead of glass and carbon fiber doors, hood, and rear wing. Despite being dimensionally bigger, the car’s dry weight stays at 2,778 lbs.</p><p class=”body-text”>It’s dimensionally bigger because Porsche is using the turbo-spec body for the first time. The rear end is 1.1-inches wider than the outgoing Cup car at 74.9-inches wide. The front end is wider too, matching the rear’s nearly 75-inch width, thanks to flared fenders. This allows using one-foot wide wheels in front and 13-imches in back. That means lots of sticky rubber will get mounted. Additionally, the front axle now gets a double-wishbone suspension with Uniball bearing instead of bushings, just like the 911 RSR, to give more precise feel at turn-in. </p><p class=”body-text”>Aerodynamically, racers will feel a lot more down force, as Porsche re-worked the front lip and installed a larger rear wing, adjustable to one of 11 different settings. Porsche claims uninterrupted under-wing airflow, meaning the down force is not only significant, but also stable.</p><div class=”embed embed-image embed-image-center embed-image-medium” data-align=”center” data-size=”medium”>

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<picture class><source media=”(min-width: 61.25rem)” srcset=”https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/porsche-911-gt3-cup-type-992-cockpit-1607795669.jpg?resize=768:*”><source media=”(min-width: 48rem)” srcset=”https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/porsche-911-gt3-cup-type-992-cockpit-1607795669.jpg?resize=980:*”><source media=”(min-width: 30rem)” srcset=”https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/porsche-911-gt3-cup-type-992-cockpit-1607795669.jpg?resize=640:*”><img alt=”a look inside the 2021 porsche 911 gt3 cup” title class=”lazyimage lazyload” data-src=”https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/porsche-911-gt3-cup-type-992-cockpit-1607795669.jpg?resize=480:*”></picture></div>

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<figcaption>A look inside the 2021 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup</figcaption><p>
<span class=”image-photo-credit”>Porsche</span></p>

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<p class=”body-text”>Inside, drivers have a new racing seat with two different seat height settings. Additionally, the steering column is adjustable and Porsche provides a range of padding thicknesses to give a wide variety of body types a comfortable and snug fit.</p><p class=”body-text”>Porsche also reworked the controls on and around the steering wheel to have easy access to lighting, ventilation, and other systems. Furthermore, a brake bias adjustment rotary knob is installed for easy and intuitive access to on-the-fly adjustments. And even race cars have “infotainment screens,” of sorts, nowadays. The GT3 Cups is 10.3-inches and filled with important information for the driver.</p><p class=”body-text”>Put it all together and Porsche claims the new GT3 Cup will lap the average race track one-percent quicker than before. I’d say that translates to about a half-second faster per lap than the old-one. Considering all of that, I’m looking forward to seeing one enter Sebring’s blind-entry, fifth-gear turn-one in anger for the first time next March.</p>

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<p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Sat, 12 Dec 2020 00:00:00 +0000 Autoweek
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2021 Porsche 911 Turbo Hits the Streets Early Next Year with 572 Horsepower https://www.autoweek.com/news/future-cars/a33327509/2021-porsche-911-turbo/
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<div><img src=”https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/p20-0371-a3-rgb-1594844257.jpg?crop=1xw:0.75xh;center,top&amp;resize=1200:*” class=”ff-og-image-inserted”></div><p class=”body-text”>In lieu of the canceled <a class=”body-link” href=”https://www.autoweek.com/geneva-auto-show/” target=”_blank” data-vars-ga-outbound-link=”https://www.autoweek.com/geneva-auto-show/”>Geneva Auto Show</a> in March of this year, <a class=”body-link” href=”https://www.autoweek.com/porsche/” target=”_blank” data-vars-ga-outbound-link=”https://www.autoweek.com/porsche/”>Porsche</a> revealed the <a class=”body-link” href=”https://www.autoweek.com/news/auto-shows/a31193438/2021-porsche-911-turbo-s-coupe-and-cabriolet-up-the-ante-to-640-horses/” target=”_blank” data-vars-ga-outbound-link=”https://www.autoweek.com/news/auto-shows/a31193438/2021-porsche-911-turbo-s-coupe-and-cabriolet-up-the-ante-to-640-horses/”>2021 911 Turbo S</a> and heralded its 640-horsepower-generating turbocharged 3.8-liter flat-six engine. Now a few months later, its little brother, the non S 911 Turbo is ready to make its debut, providing just 572 horsepower to play with from an engine with the same displacement. That’s 68 horsepower less than the S, but also matches the last generation Turbo S’ output.</p><div class=”embed embed-image embed-image-center embed-image-medium” data-align=”center” data-size=”medium”>

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<figcaption>The 2021 Porsche 911 Turbo in profile.</figcaption><p>
<span class=”image-photo-credit”>Porsche</span></p>

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<p class=”body-text”>Long story short, Porsche seems to have figured out this horsepower thing pretty darn well. To make it happen, Porsche uses two variable geometry turbochargers that adjust the turbine blades much like a constant speed propeller does on an airplane. From there, electrically controlled bypass valves, a re-designed charge air cooling system, and piezo fuel injectors all contribute to the 32 hp and 67 lb-ft gain in output over the last generation Turbo. </p><p class=”body-text”>Used in conjunction with the eight-speed <a class=”body-link” href=”https://www.autoweek.com/news/technology/a1820991/what-pdk-autoweek-explains/” target=”_blank” data-vars-ga-outbound-link=”https://www.autoweek.com/news/technology/a1820991/what-pdk-autoweek-explains/”>dual-clutch transmission Porsche calls PDK</a> and all-wheel-drive, 60 mph is just 2.7 seconds away from rest, 2.8 seconds if you select the cabriolet. Try as you might, you won’t quite make it to a double century as this 992 generation 911 Turbo tops out at 198 mph. Unless, perhaps, you find a nice big hill to drive down.</p><div class=”embed embed-image embed-image-center embed-image-medium” data-align=”center” data-size=”medium”>

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<figcaption>A look inside the 2021 Porsche 911 Turbo</figcaption><p>
<span class=”image-photo-credit”>Porsche</span></p>

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<p class=”body-text”>As did the Turbo S, the Turbo has a 1.7-inch wider front and 0.4-inch wider rear track than the outdoing model and uses a wider set of staggered tires: 255/35R20s in front and 315/30R21s in back. Porsche also wedged in bigger brake discs, now measuring 16.1-inches in front, 15.0 in back. If that’s not enough for you, Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes will be optionally available.</p><p class=”body-text”>When the going gets curvy, 2021 Porsche 911 Turbos now come standard with rear-axle steering and adjustable dampers called Porsche Active Suspension Management or PASM. More standard equipment includes the <a class=”body-link” href=”https://www.autoweek.com/news/sports-cars/g32226310/porsches-claims-are-a-bunch-of-hot-airand-cold-air-too/” target=”_blank” data-vars-ga-outbound-link=”https://www.autoweek.com/news/sports-cars/g32226310/porsches-claims-are-a-bunch-of-hot-airand-cold-air-too/”>adaptive aerodynamics</a> that utilize an adjustable air flap and spoiler in front and an a bigger wing with multiple settings in back. </p>

<p class=”body-text”>But don’t worry, there’re still lots of ways to spend your money. You can upgrade to a sport exhaust system, lower the Turbo by 0.4-in with the sport suspension, add adaptive anti-roll bars called PDCC or Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control, even commit to the Lightweight and Sport packages. The former removes the rear seats, reduces noise insulation, and adds full bucket front seats, which takes 66 lbs out of the car. The latter adds some carbon-fiber and other design-oriented bits.</p><p class=”body-text”>Inside, you get a 10.9-inch screen to work with and 14-way power adjustable seats to sit in as standard. There’s also a GT steering wheel, the Sport Chrono package and a nice stereo to listen to. Base price comes to $172,150 for the coupe and $184,950 for the cabriolet, which translates to a $32,700 discount for either coupe or cabriolet when compared to the Turbo S. Is that savings worth it for losing 68 horsepower? We’ll let you know once we get the chance to drive it. </p>

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<p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Wed, 15 Jul 2020 00:00:00 +0000 Autoweek
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Introducing the 2021 Porsche 911 Targa 4S Heritage Design Edition https://www.autoweek.com/news/future-cars/a32734700/2021-porsche-911-targa-4s-heritage-design-edition/
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<div><img src=”https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/19pag-01-final-1591048289.jpg?crop=1.00xw:0.668xh;0,0&amp;resize=1200:*” class=”ff-og-image-inserted”></div><p class=”body-text”>Expected to arrive at U.S. dealers late this year, Porsche’s Targa 4S Heritage Design Edition is a modern car with design elements inside and out that are meant to remind you of a 1950s <a class=”body-link” href=”https://www.autoweek.com/porsche/” target=”_blank” data-vars-ga-outbound-link=”https://www.autoweek.com/porsche/”>Porsche</a>. It’s a package put together by Porsche Exclusive Manufaktur, the personalization/customization arm of Porsche cars. </p><p class=”body-text”>Starting with a <a class=”body-link” href=”https://www.autoweek.com/news/future-cars/a32498686/porsche-911-targa-4-and-4s-992-specs-photos/” target=”_blank” data-vars-ga-outbound-link=”https://www.autoweek.com/news/future-cars/a32498686/porsche-911-targa-4-and-4s-992-specs-photos/”>2021 911 Targa 4S</a>, Porsche Exclusive adds a cherry metallic paint, or one of four additional special paint colors. From there, gold logos join the party. You also get spear-shaped graphic elements on the front fenders. In back, Porsche Exclusive adds a Porsche Heritage badge, inspired by one given to <a class=”body-link” href=”https://www.autoweek.com/car-life/classic-cars/a1698836/porsche-made-nearly-perfect-clone-first-356/” target=”_blank” data-vars-ga-outbound-link=”https://www.autoweek.com/car-life/classic-cars/a1698836/porsche-made-nearly-perfect-clone-first-356/”>Porsche 356</a> owners that accumulated 100,000 kilometers on their odometers.</p>

<p class=”body-text”>From there, the Porsche crest from 1963 is added to the front luggage compartment lid, steering wheel, head restraints, wheel hub covers, keys and key pouch. The wheels themselves are Carrera Exclusive Design wheels with black painted brake calipers visible from behind. Sadly, the tires are not bias-ply, so authenticity stops there.</p><p class=”body-text”>Inside, you can choose different leathers, such as Bordeaux red or Atacama beige. There’s also corduroy on the seats and door trims for more 356 throwbacks. When checking engine speed, it will be lit with green illumination, as will the stopwatch on the Sport Chrono Package that is standard on this car. Finally, Porsche Exclusive will add a metal badge on the trim panel with which limited edition number you own.</p>

<p class=”body-text”>How limited? Porsche will build 992 of the 2021 Targa 4S Heritage Design Edition models because the company likes symbolism in its build numbers. The <a class=”body-link” href=”https://www.autoweek.com/drives/a2136101/2019-porsche-911-speedster-first-drive-less-and-more/” target=”_blank” data-vars-ga-outbound-link=”https://www.autoweek.com/drives/a2136101/2019-porsche-911-speedster-first-drive-less-and-more/”>2019 Porsche Speedster</a>, for example, was limited to 1,948 as a homage to the first model year of the 356. And since it’s being built on the 992 generation 911, well, there you go.</p><p class=”body-text”>Because Porsche Exclusive starts with a 2021 Targa 4S, you get a 443-hp, 3.0-liter turbocharged flat-six to move around your<em> Leave it to Beaver</em>-era clad Porsche and all the other modern touches that come in the car. It also means you can choose to have this Heritage Design Edition equipped with either an eight-speed PDK or seven-speed manual transmission. But bear in mind, getting it with the PDK is sacrilegious—Porsche didn’t even have automatics in the ’50s. </p><p class=”body-text”>This Targa 4S will be the first of four cars labeled as Heritage Design models, each one celebrating a different decade: 1950s, 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. Porsche stayed mum on the details, but expecting one a year for a bit is not a bad guess. And they’ll cost a healthy premium over the base model. A Targa 4S starts at $136,550. The Heritage Design Edition starts at $181,950. </p><p class=”body-text”>And if that’s isn’t enough, you can also buy a $14,000 limited-edition timepiece that follows the same design cues as the car. And just like that car, Porsche is only making 992 of them.</p><p class=”body-text”>Plenty of 1950s charm, but certainly not 1950s prices.</p>

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<p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Mon, 01 Jun 2020 22:09:37 +0000 Autoweek
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